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Karriereveränderungen

Karrieren verändern sich – mit mehr Möglichkeiten und weniger Hürden auf der einen Seite, aber mit wahrscheinlicheren Arbeitsplatzverlusten, Unterbeschäftigung und Arbeitsplatzunsicherheit auf der anderen. Dennoch sind Menschen nicht nur Opfer solcher ökonomischen Stressoren, doch aktiv Handelnde, die mit einer Vielfalt von Herangehensweisen ihre Karrieren proaktiv gestalten können. Stressors1 Banner
Unsere Forschung hier beschäftigt sich mit der beruflichen Anpassungsfähigkeit angesichts ökonomischer Stressoren (Arbeitsplatzunsicherheit, Arbeitsplatzverlust, Arbeitslosigkeit, Unterbeschäftigung), ihrer Prädiktoren und Konsequenzen, aber auch mit Möglichkeiten, Motivation und Arbeitsmarktfähigkeit von (Langzeit-)Arbeitslosen zu erfassen und zu fördern. Weiterhin unterstützen wir einen regen Austausch zwischen den Literaturen zu unterschiedlichen ökonomischen Stressoren auch durch herausgeberische Tätigkeit.

 

 Previous publications in this line of study include:

  • Klehe, U.-C., van Vianen, A.E.M., & Zikic, J. (in press).
    Coping with economic stress: Introduction to the Special Issue.
    Journal of Organizational Behavior.
      
Abstract
This special issue presents five papers, four empirical and one conceptual, on how people deal with different forms and stages of economic stress. Three manuscripts address coping with job insecurity in one’s regular job or in the context of self-employment. These papers focus on the multidimensional nature and the development of insecurity over time, personal and social resources, along with organizational interventions that are helpful in minimizing these aversive effects. The remaining two papers address respondents’ coping with unemployment and factors that may either motivate people to seek help and search for reemployment or turn unemployed workers into discouraged workers who are giving up in the face of their dire situation.
Availability
Journal’s website:
Open access download: -
Further access: please contact  to receive a copy of the manuscript.

 

 

  • Van Vianen, A. E. M., Klehe, U.-C., Koen, J., & Dries, N. (in press).
    Career Adapt-Abilities Scale - Netherlands Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Ability, Personality, and Regulatory Focus.
    Journal of Vocational Behavior. 
      
Abstract
The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) - Netherlands Form consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from satisfactory to excellent. The factor structure was quite similar to the one computed for the combined data from 13 countries. The Dutch version of the CAAS - Netherlands Form is identical to the International Form 2.0. The convergent validity of the CAAS-Netherlands was established with relating the CAAS subscales to self-esteem, Big Five personality measures, and regulatory focus. Relations between the subscales and these stable personality factors were largely as predicted. The discriminant validity of the CAAS-Netherlands was established by relating the CAAS scores to general mental ability; no significant relationship between career adaptability and general mental ability was found.
Availability
Journal’s website: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001879112000048?v=s5
Open access download: -
Further access: please contact  to receive a copy of the manuscript.

 

  • Klehe, U.-C., Zikic, J., VanVianan, A. E. M., & DePater, I. E. (2011).
    Career adaptability, turnover, and loyalty during organizational downsizing.
    Journal of Vocational Behavior, 79, 217-229.
      
Abstract
During organizational restructuring and downsizing, employees often worry about being redundant, actually are redundant, and/or feel unsatisfied with their jobs. Employees, in turn, often react with poor loyalty to and high voluntary exit from the organization. The current study addresses this process from a careers' perspective, showing that career adaptability in the form of employees' career exploration and planning can account for at least some of these relationships. Redundancy fostered employees' career adaptive behaviors while job insecurity inhibited their career planning. Career planning, in turn, positively predicted employees' loyalty to the organization five months later while career exploration negatively predicted employees' loyalty, and positively predicted employees' exit reactions in the form of turnover intentions, job-search behaviors, and actual turnover. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.
Availability
Journal’s website: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001879111000066
Open access download: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hebis:26-opus-85235

 

  • Koen, J., Klehe, U.-C., Zikic, J., & vanVianen, A. E., M. (2010).
    Job-search strategies and reemployment quality: The impact of career adaptability.
    Journal of Vocational Behavior, 77, 126-139. 
      
Abstract
Past job-search research has focused on how hard unemployed people search for a job, but we still know little about the strategies that people use during their search and how we can predict the quality of the reemployment found. The first aim of this study was to predict the use of different job-search strategies via job-seekers' career adaptability. The second aim was to examine the impact of different job-search strategies on both the number of job-offers and the quality of the obtained job. In a two-wave study, 248 unemployed people indicated their career adaptability and the job-search strategies that they used. The use of a focused and exploratory strategy contributed to the number of job offers, whereas the use of an exploratory strategy reduced the quality of reemployment 8 months later. Moreover, career decision making and career confidence positively predicted reemployment quality. Implications for reemployment practice and further research are discussed.
Availability
Journal’s website: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001879110000588
Open access download: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hebis:26-opus-85240

 

  • DePater, I. E., VanVianen, A. E. M., Brechtold, M., & Klehe, U.-C. (2009).
    Employees’ challenging job experiences and supervisors’ evaluations of promotability.
    Personnel Psychology, 62, 297-325. 
      
Abstract
Promotability evaluations are important for individuals' career development and organizations' human resource management practices. Nevertheless, little empirical research has addressed predictors of promotability evaluations, and the studies that have, have often focused on current job performance and fixed, nonbehavioral predictors. This study takes a more behavioral approach, and investigates whether besides how one performs (i.e., job performance) what one performs also serves as an indicator of promotability. Specifically, we examine the relationship between employees' challenging job experiences and supervisors' evaluations of employees' promotability over and above employees' current job performance. Results from 3 field studies, sampling different types of employees via different measures, consistently showed that challenging job experiences explained incremental variance in supervisory and organizational evaluations of promotability over and above current job performance and job tenure.
Availability
Journal’s website: http://www.docstoc.com/docs/43238374/EMPLOYEES-CHALLENGING-JOB-EXPERIENCES-AND-SUPERVISORS-EVALUATIONS-OF-PROMOTABILITY
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1744-6570.2009.01139.x/full
Open access download: -
Further access: please contact to receive a copy of the manuscript.

 

  • Zikic, J. & Klehe, U.-C. (2006).
    Job Loss as Blessing in Disguise: Career Activities as predictors of Reemployment Quality.
    Journal of Vocational Behavior, 69, 391-409.
      
Abstract
Job loss is one of the most difficult work related situations that an individual may encounter. Yet, sometimes job loss may also turn into a blessing in disguise. Combining the careers literature with the literature on unemployment, the current paper addresses potential positive outcomes of job loss by focusing on specific career adaptability activities that individuals can undertake to obtain these outcomes. Three hundred and four unemployed outplacement attendees reported their use of self and environmental career exploration and career planning, as well as of job search (general and networking) and the availability of two resources that may foster these activities, general self-efficacy and social support. Six months later, 215 individuals reported their current reemployment status and, when applicable, the quality of that reemployment. Results replicate the positive effects of job search on finding reemployment but moreover outline the relevance of career planning and exploration during unemployment on ensuring the quality of this reemployment. Theoretical implications and directions for practice and future research are discussed.
Availability
Journal’s website: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001879106000613
Open access download: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hebis:26-opus-85254
Further access: please contact  to receive a copy of the manuscript.

 

  • Klehe, U.-C., Koen, J., & dePater, I. E. (in press).
    Ending on the scrap heap? Aging and job search.
    In Hedge, J. & Borman, W. (Eds.) Oxford Handbook of Work and Aging. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. 
      
Abstract
Job loss and unemployment are among the worst stressors that people can encounter during their lifetimes, and the search for (re-)employment is often a process troubled with setbacks and disappointments. While older workers are often shielded from job loss by higher tenure in their current organization, they might be struck particularly harshly when trying to fi nd re-employment elsewhere. The current chapter combines earlier conceptual and empirical work on coping with job loss and job search with work on employability and the stereotypes that may turn the coping and job-search process into a severe challenge, particularly among older workers. For this purpose, we fi rst outline the situation of older workers in the workforce, highlighting their vulnerability to possible job loss. We then draw on earlier conceptual work on job loss and on coping with job loss to depict a chronological process model of anticipation, job loss, and unemployment. In this model, we also consider the manifest and latent work functions that may be lost, the subsequent consequences for unemployed people’s psychological and physical health, and the different coping options available, particularly to older workers. In the end, older workers face an uphill battle when searching for re-employment, and one of our last sections outlines some actions that older workers might undertake to face the situation more successfully.
Availability
Journal’s website: -
Open access download: -
Further access: please contact to receive a copy of the manuscript.